Educating for Sustainability

CURRICULUM LIBRARY

UNIT: Wastewater Context for Matter and Its Interactions

LESSON: Reclaimed water

Part of a series of lessons in a unit called Wastewater Context for Matter and its interactions. Designed for middle school physical science, students will learn about reclaimed water and how it prevents the wastewater from ever entering the sound.

Lesson Specs

Suitable for Grades

8th Grade
7th Grade
6th Grade

Satisfies Academic Standards: 

OSPI ESE 2: The Natural & Built Environment
OSPI ESE 3: Sustainability & Civic Responsibility

Sustainable System Focus:

Water

Academic Subjects

Engineering
Science

Submitted by:

Jeffrey Burgard

Last Updated:

Content Connection

Scientific Principle(s)

  1. In chemical reactions mass is conserved

 

Application

  1. Reclaimed water can add to our water supply and be used for a variety of non-drinking applications

Community Relevance

Wastewater that would otherwise be released into the sound can be redirected to irrigation and other applications so that fresh water may be conserved

Lesson Plan

Teacher Materials

  1. Video: New York Times - Reclaimed water
  2. Video: A Singapore Success Story
  3. Powerpoint Slides
  4. King County Reclaimed Water Diagram

 

Additional resources

  1. Video: Would you drink water made from sewage
  2. Video: Reclaimed water

 

Student Material

  1. Notebook

Time needed: 1 period or shorter

  1. Have students watch the : New York Times - Reclaimed water video and have a discussion
  2. Have students watch A Singapore Success Story and have a discussion
  3. Share with students the Powerpoint Slides so they can add the scientific principle and application.
  4. Share the rest of the slides and the King County Reclaimed Water Diagram. Have a discussion about what King County should do with its reclaimed water. Should the program be expanded like Singapore’s?

Questions?  Email us at info@sustainabilityambassadors.org

  • Instagram
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter
  • Vimeo Social Icon

© Sustainability Ambassadors 2020

website built by youth leaders

Seattle, King County, Washington